TransUnion was hacked; the personal information of 37,000 Canadians might be stolen

Supported By:

Net Patrol International Inc.  Data Investigation and Forensic Services
Bankruptcy and Insolvency Trustees

Toronto (October 11, 2019) – TransUnion, one of Canada’s credit monitoring agencies, was hacked between June and July. Due to fraudulent use of the login credentials of a business customer, the personal information of 37,000 Canadians might have been stolen. Nevertheless, the agency did not clarify what kind of personal information has been compromised.

The personal information of 37,000 Canadians might have been compromised in yet another data breach. On October 9, TransUnion notified the public that between June and July they had been hacked. TransUnion is one of two Canadian credit reporting agencies.

The hackers fraudulently used the login credentials of one of TransUnion’s business customers. “The unauthorized access was not the result of a breach or failure of TransUnion’s systems or our customer’s system,” company spokesperson David Blumberg said.

The credit monitoring agency learned about the breach in August and is still investigating the incident. The agency did not disclose what kind of personal information has been compromised. Nevertheless, the privacy commissioners are informed and the people have been contacted whose information may have been accessed.

The incident at TransUnion joins the ranks of numerous data breaches in recent years. In 2017, the information of 19,000 Canadians has been stolen from Equifax, the other Canadian credit monitoring agency. This year alone, the information of six million CapitalOne customers as well as 2.7 million Desjardins customers in Canada has been compromised.