Man arrested for allegedly defrauding elderly London woman out of $1.25M

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London (December 11, 2019) – London police arrested Jeremy Walzack on December 6 for allegedly defrauding an elderly London woman over five years. The woman reported to the police that the suspect had been borrowing approximately $1.25 million from her under false pretenses. Subsequently, the police charged Walzack with Fraud Over $5,000 and Possession Proceeds Obtained By Crime Over $5,000. Furthermore, the London police issued a fraud warning since another elderly London woman recently lost $85,000 to a phone scammer. The two incidents are unrelated and the investigation into the latter is still ongoing.

The London police issued a fraud warning in a press release on December 9, while announcing an arrest in a fraud incident.

London man allegedly defrauded an elderly woman

An elderly London woman reported to the police being defrauded out of approximately $1.25 million. She accused Jeremy Walzack of borrowing money from her under false pretenses between 2013 and 2018. The police did not specify how Walzack and the alleged victim knew each other.

Consequently, the police arrested the 33-year-old man from London on December 6. Walzack is now facing charges of Fraud Over $5,000 and Possessing Proceeds Obtained By Crime Over $5,000. He is expected to appear in London court on December 12.

London police issued fraud warning due to another incident including an elderly woman

Moreover, another elderly London woman recently fell prey to a scam. The other woman was contacted by a fraudster who pretended that her credit card had been compromised and directed her to pay money to the police through a Bitcoin machine to assist in the investigation. The woman lost $85,000. The two incidents are unrelated and the investigation into the latter is still ongoing.

As a consequence, police issued a fraud warning on December 9 and urged the public to stay informed about various ways criminals deceive their victims. ‘These scams are sophisticated and criminals are using technology to trick the victim into believing that the information presented to them by the suspect is real,’ said Detective Sergeant Henry Pateman of the London police. ‘Don’t ever provide personal or financial information to anyone unless you know the person you are giving it to.’

Read more: Elderly London woman taken for her life savings, three month investigation finds

Furthermore, the police reminded the public that bank employees, representatives with the Canada Revenue Agency, or other such officials, will never ask for payment via Bitcoin, gift cards or through money transfer services (e.g. Western Union).