Fraudsters impersonating police, Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre

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Net Patrol International Inc.  Data Investigation and Forensic Services
Bankruptcy and Insolvency Trustees

The Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre (CAFC), the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) are warning Canadians about the increasing threat of fraudsters impersonating the CAFC and police services.

Sometimes, fraudsters are claiming to assist the CAFC with an ongoing investigation using their letterhead and logo as part of the fraud or, in other cases, they spoof police phone numbers. The three most common impersonation scams to look out for include:

Bank investigator

The fraudster claims to be from the bank, a major credit card provider or, in some cases, from businesses such as Amazon. They say there are unauthorized charges on your account or that your account is compromised. At times, the fraudster demands that you provide your credit card information and that you send money for reimbursement fees or as bait money to help catch a bad employee.

In order to convince the victim that it’s a legitimate investigation, fraudsters send a fraudulent letter via email, which may include the CAFC’s logo. The letter will advise that the CAFC is investigating and that you, the victim, must co-operate in order to “catch” the suspect. Fraudulent contact information (phone number and email address) is provided so that you communicate with them.

Tech support

The fraudster claims a virus infected your computer. Fraudsters state that your computer is sending out viruses or has been hacked and must be serviced. They request access to your computer and may run programs or alter settings. Fraudsters will claim that they have found fraudulent activity on your computer and an investigation is required. Victims are contacted by:

  • Alarming website pop-ups that demand you call a number urgently
  • Unsolicited telephone calls (they may claim to be a Microsoft or other well-known computer company employee)

Fraudsters send a fraudulent letter via email, which may include the CAFC’s logo. The letter will advise that the CAFC is investigating and that you, the victim, must co-operate in order to “catch” the suspect. Fraudulent contact information (phone number and email address) is provided for you to communicate with them.

Recovery pitch

If you have been a victim of a fraud, you may be targeted again with a promise to get your money back. Fraudsters will claim to be from a government agency or law enforcement and ask for your help with a “sting” operation to take down scammers who stole your money.

To convince you that these are legitimate investigations, or that they have found fraudulent activity on your computer, fraudsters send a letter by email, which may include the CAFC’s logo. The letter will advise that the CAFC is investigating and that you must co-operate to “catch” the suspect. They will provide fraudulent contact information (phone number and email address) for you to communicate with them. They will claim that a payment is required to assist with the investigation and will promise to return the funds, but they never will.

This article was originally sourced from www.orilliamatters.com