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Ex-Canadian Football player pleads guilty in College Admissions Scandal Case

Boston (March 20, 2020) – Ex-Canadian Football League player, David Sidoo, pleaded guilty before a federal court in Boston to one count of conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud in connection with the College Admissions Scandal on March 13. The father of two sons from Vancouver admitted to participating in the U.S.-wide conspiracy with the plea. The U.S. District Court Judge Gorton scheduled his sentencing for July 15.

Ex-Canadian Football League player and Vancouver businessman, David Sidoo, pleaded guilty in connection with the College Admissions Scandal on March 13, according to a press release of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the District of Massachusetts.

College Admissions Case

Sidoo was the first parent from British Columbia who has been indicted in the context of the U.S. wide College Admissions Scandal. The 60-year-old was charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud as well as money laundering conspiracy. On March 13, the ex-CFL player pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud before the U.S. District Court Judge Gorton in Boston.

As part of the plea, Sidoo agreed to a sentence that includes 90 days in prison and a US$250,000 fine. The deal still has to be approved by the judge. His sentencing is scheduled for July 15.

U.S. College Admissions Scandal – A Nationwide Conspiracy

Last year, multiple wealthy parents were arrested and charged in connection with the college admissions scandal. They are accused of getting involved in fraudulent methods such as cheating on college entrance-exams to get admission into prestigious U.S. colleges and universities for their children.

Read more: Second B.C. parent facing charges in connection with U.S. college admission scandal

In 2011, Sidoo allegedly paid US$200,000 to a co-conspirator in exchange for secretly taking the SATs – a standardized college admission test – on behalf of his two sons.

Prominent parents who have been linked to the scheme are actors such as Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman. The latter was sentenced to 14 days in prison on September 13. Among the accused are also athletic coaches from Yale, Stanford, USC, Wake Forest, and Georgetown as well as exam administrators. Many of the accused already pleaded guilty. The sentences for involved parents range from no prison time to nine months behind bars.